Sunday, November 04, 2007

Guest Post by our friend, Jann...

Last week my dear friends and horse lovers had an extremely frightful experience. Pesky, their loving Tennessee Walker foaled a beautiful filly but her entire uterus prolapsed. Miraculously, she overcame a series of nearly impossible obstacles and mare and foal are both now healthy and thriving.

First, despite the fact that having her entire uterus inside-out and hanging outside so that she could not stand up or walk, she managed to get up and climb into the stock trailer where she collapsed. Her newborn filly rode in the back of my friends truck cab as they raced toward Bakersfield to the vets [about an 80 minute trip]. Quite amazingly she survived the trip, but had lost over 5 gallons of blood by the time they arrived at 2 am. Basically they pretty much brought a dead horse to the vet.

Most vets would have taken one look at the dying mare in their trailer and told them euthanasia was their only option. They all knew well that Pesky’s chances for survival were extremely minimal, with many statistically horrendous hurdles to get through before she had even a reasonable chance of survival. Dr. P took one look and asked, "Shall we try anyway with this mare?"

After several hours of repeated tries the uterus was reinserted. Pesky’s chances of ever standing up again were slim because of the epidurals and general anesthetics given her. But at 8 am she stood up! She received 9 liters of blood from a donor Arabian gelding. However, this was only the first of several vital hurdles. Her legs were cold with no discernible pulse for all those hours that she was flat down, so founder was likely, even if she survived short term. But her legs and feet are all fine and healthy!Miracle piled upon miracle, and after a roller coaster series of blood transfusions, jaundice, and other related problems with both mare and foal, they both came through with flying colors! After nine days at the vet, Friday afternoon the happy pair came come.

Dr. P always goes the extra mile to help with our horses. One night she came speeding to our stables to the aid of Belle, a mustang who had just arrived from the mustang reservation. Belle had spit her entire nose open after exploding into a fence post. No other vet in our area would come to our aid and work on her because she was a mustang. Dr. P worked effortlessly through the fence while TnT held Belle with ropes.

There are true heroes among us. And those of us who adore our horses appreciate Dr. P and her endless efforts to save rather than destroy a horse.




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MnC's Disclaimer: At no time is excessive force, cruelty or brutality used when training the horses pictured in this blog. Reinforcing pats and firm gentleness, along with calmness from the trainers, encourage the horses to do as they are asked.

8 comments:

Midlife Mom said...

Hi Janey, good always good to hear from you! That is an amazing story of that mare and foal, I agree that there were many miracles and such a wonderful vet! What would we do without our vets? I fear for mine as he is so overworked and I'm afraid he will stop doing large animals and take the easier route like so many and just do the small animals. It's hard to get new vets to come to Maine, they just don't want to live so far away from everything and of course our cold winter weather discourages many. What a wonderful story of the mare and foal and I hope they continue to thrive!! :o) Yes, Kipper's snuggling almost had me in tears. He is such a sweet little pony and is wonderful with my grandkids. He has Cushings disease which is heartbreaking for me as I think it will shorten his life. He is about 10 now and no symptoms other then the excessive urination and of course he is on medication every day. He is short, fat and fuzzy. I know you must miss your boys and your horses terribly. Will you get to visit often? I'm so blessed that my son (only child) lives about a 5 minute walk from us through the woods so we see him and his family often plus he works in the business with his father which makes it nice.

Guess I have rambled on long enough! Take care!

Janey Loree said...

Hi Midlife Mom! Yes, our vet has come through for us more than once!! She took care of all our horses and completely understood how much they meant to TnT and I. She was at the ready when the guys had to leave Maggie up in the Sierra Nevada Mountains last year...unfortunately Maggie didn't make it home to be taken straight to the vet.

Don't ever worry about ramblin' on over here...You fit in quite nicely, I would say!!! I'll be stopping by Home On The Range to see how you're doin'...

Simply Marvelous said...

What a miracle that was! Thanks for the wonderful photo. Great to see after such a story!

Katt said...

I unfortunetly do not own a horse. I did when I was younger and didnt live in the city. I miss is soooooooo much. I love your blog and will come and drool often LOL. Thanks
Katt

Sharon Lynne said...

What a wonderful outcome! I'm glad they are doing well.

Janey Loree said...

Hi Katt! Thanks for dropping by MnC, you are welcome anytime.

Hello Cousin! I am going to ask Jann for an update...(maybe she will read this and answer!!!)

the laughing gypsy said...

Thank God! Most stories I hear about a prolapsed uterus do NOT have such happy endings! Carrots and kisses to the mare and foal--and to the people who believed they could make it!

Janey Loree said...

Hi Laughing Gypsy! Thanks for stopping by, I will send the carrots and kisses on to Jann so that she can convey them to the mare and foal when she goes to see how they are!!!

Summitt For Circuit City's new "FireDog"!

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